The Philosophy of Frankenweenie

Everyone knows the names of the great philosophers in life.  Aristotle believed in doing good for goodness’ sake.  Socrates held virtue above all other human characteristics.  Nietzsche thought that people were driven by achievement.  And Tim Burton argues that reality and the impossible walk a fine line.

My name is Jessica and I believe in Tim Burton.

I have been a Burtonite since I was a child with such greats as Beetlejuice, Batman, Batman Returns, Edward Scissorhands, and what seems to be everyone’s favorite these days, The Nightmare Before Christmas frequently playing in the VCR.  Granted, it wasn’t until high school that I discovered that all of my favorite movies were from the mind of a dark and twisted genius who grew up lonely in the suburbs of Burbank, California.  In college, my world became immersed with reading his autobiography (now in a rereleased extended version) and learning everything I could about my favorite filmmaker.

So when I learned that Frankenweenie was to be remade from a live-action short film into a feature-length stop-motion animated tale, I was happier than a goth kid at a Marilyn Manson concert.

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